The Common Voice, Issue 10, May 2019

Issue # 10, April 2019

Inside The Common Voice, issue number ten: MPA network updateCCIRA hires new staff, Oceans RFA formalizes collaborative marine management process…

A diver swims through a large school of subadult widow rockfish while conducting rockfish research

MPA network update

Work continues on the Canada-British Columbia Marine Protected Area Network Strategy—a government-to-government-to-government effort to create a marine protected area network within 13 bioregions in Canada, including the Central Coast of BC. This work—co-led by provincial and federal agencies along with 17 First Nations (including Central Coast Nations)—is critical to protect marine resources that are in

Michael has a dark brown beard, and is wearing a grey cap and blue SFU hoodie. He's bending forwards and seems to be working with other people who are crouched or standing on the beach around him. He is standing on the sand and the ocean is visible directly behind him. He is smiling widely.

CCIRA hires new staff

See all of our team members. Jean-Phillip Sargeant, Marine Response Coordinator Jean has a passion for resource management and the marine environment. After graduating from the University of Victoria with a degree in geography he spent time abroad to acquire a graduate degree in coastal and marine resource management. Jean has had the opportunity to

Aerial view of the white and blue and green brilliance of the herring spawn in Kitasoo/Xai’xais territory.

Oceans RFA formalizes collaborative marine management process

In June 2018, on National Indigenous People’s Day, representatives from 14 First Nations gathered near Prince Rupert, along with officials from Canada’s Federal Government, to announce a landmark agreement for working together to protect and manage the North Pacific Coast. The Reconciliation Framework Agreement for Bioregional Oceans Management and Protection, often referred to simply as

Quillback rockfish and plumose anenome in waters off the central coast of British Columbia

Groundfish chasing the light for science

Counting fish isn’t easy – especially when counting live fish that are swimming around in the depths of the ocean. But since 2015, CCIRA has been doing just that by towing a video camera equipped with lasers behind a boat. Using data from this work, CCIRA scientists have published a paper in the journal Biological

Ernie (right) and Sandie (left) are on a boat and sitting on either side of a metal crab trap full of crabs. Both are wearing large, dark green rain coats. Sandie is holding a clipboard. The water behind them looks cold and grey, and there are evergreens in the distance.

Crab pilot project a positive step towards collaborative fisheries management

Together, the project partners conducted an extensive assessment of current crab science. This included the science our Nations have conducted within our territories that incorporates our Indigenous and local knowledge. This illustrates DFO’s willingness to accept Indigenous knowledge and Western science as complementary ways of knowing…

Heiltsuk Guardian Watchmen, Jordan Wilson (right), and CCIRA’s Marine Implementation Coordinator, Anna Gerrard, conducting field research.

Incorporating Indigenous perspectives in research

Under the direction of our Science Coordinator, Alejandro Frid, CCIRA has established a record of publishing in top scientific journals. This growing body of work illustrates CCIRA’s commitment to doing rigorous research on marine resources that matter to our Nations, while also illustrating how Indigenous knowledge and Western science can complement one another. In collaboration

IMAX Director, Ian McAllister interviewing Mercedes Robinson- Neasloss for the lm. Photo by MacGillivray Freeman.

Great Bear Rainforest IMAX features our Nations

In February of this year a really big film hit theatres around the world. Three years in the making, the Great Bear Rainforest IMAX showcases the wild beauty and rich wildlife of the coast. Importantly, it also features Central Coast First Nations people and our strong ties to this place as its original stewards…

First Nations researcher counting Dungeness crabs in a trap.

CCIRA Job Posting – EXTENDED

CCIRA is extending its offering for a new position for Indigenous youth. The successful candidate will work closely with the CCIRA Marine Planner, Marine Implementation Coordinator and Central Coast First Nation communities to implement key elements of the MaPP workplan. This junior position offers a great opportunity for a strong candidate (from any First Nation)

Kitasoo/Xai'Xais' Vernon Brown contemplatingBrock a yelloweye rockfish

Rebuilding depleted fisheries: why it matters to coastal communities

Our Nations have a deep connection with the ocean. For millennia, the ocean has provided for our people, sustaining us physically, culturally and economically.  Sadly, industrial fishing practices have depleted many of fisheries we rely on. In this video, filmmaker and Oceana Canada’s Senior Advisor, Alexandra Cousteau, spends time in our communities to learn about the

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