Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance

First Nations culture and well-being are intricately linked to the health of our environment. For over 10,000 years we sustainably managed our territorial resources, ensuring that the trees, fish and water in our territories provided for today’s needs without compromising the health of the resources for future generations.

Working to sustain us

Over the last 100 years we have watched as a sector-by-sector approach to resource management has depleted resources on the land and in the ocean.

The Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance is working to return us to the healthy communities and sustainable resource management practices of our past by ensuring First Nations interests and traditional knowledge are balanced with the best western science.

Keepers of the Coast

Watch this documentary 

Stewarding our marine territories

The central coast of British Columbia is one of the most spectacular and biologically rich places left on the planet – where ancient temperate rainforest intertwines with the living Pacific. The Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv who have inhabited the central coast for thousands of years have joined forces, forming the Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance, otherwise known as CCIRA.

More about CCIRA 


Recent posts

Issue # 8, April 2017
May 10, 2017
We published the eighth issue of The Common Voice in April of 2017...
Rockfish research linked to indigenous rights
May 8, 2017
Fifty years ago Charlie Mason could hop in a boat, travel a short distance from his home in Klemtu, catch enough rockfish for a meal or two, and then head back to town. “Today it is not that easy,” he says.
Rockfish research: key results and potential management actions
May 8, 2017
Over the past 50 years the central coast has seen a significant increase in recreational and commercial rockfish fishing. Our Nations are concerned about the impact these fisheries are having on this important food resource. In response CCIRA launched a rockfish research project in 2013. Here, we present a summary of results from a recent rockfish study in our territories.
Bears, salmon and our people.
April 25, 2017
Bears, salmon, indigenous rights, and local management of resources all converge in this beautiful and moving video.
Nuxalk ancestral governance project
April 21, 2017
150 years ago western governments imposed a system of governance on our people that does not recognize our values, traditions or laws. Since then, our Nations have effectively been cut out of decisions that affect our people. The Indigenous Law Project has been one way that our Nations have been working to shift the conversation towards one that integrates our culture and makes us decision-makers in our territories.
Nathan E. Stewart not going away
April 18, 2017
Five months ago the Nathan E. Stewart made headlines when it ran aground in Heiltsuk territory spilling 110, 000 litres of diesel into coastal waters. The news reports may have faded but the impact of the spill has not...
Bringing ooligan home to Bella Coola
April 14, 2017
After years without any ooligan to render into grease, the Nuxalk Nation are celebrating. For the first time in many years there is a stink box full of ooligan beside the Bella Coola river.
CCIRA's herring research
April 11, 2017
This video highlights the herring research being done by CCIRA in collaboration with Simon Fraser University. This work is providing new information to help protect a resource that is a critical part of First Nations' culture and and coastal ecosystems.
Trust: A fundamental step towards collaborative fisheries management
April 5, 2017
Last year our Nations had some major challenges with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) with respect to the management of crab and herring. This is nothing new. In our attempts to protect the resources in our territories, our Nations have often gone head-to-head with DFO. We’ve had to.

CCIRA

Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance

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