Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance

First Nations culture and well-being are intricately linked to the health of our environment. For over 10,000 years we sustainably managed our territorial resources, ensuring that the trees, fish and water in our territories provided for today’s needs without compromising the health of the resources for future generations.

Working to sustain us

Over the last 100 years we have watched as a sector-by-sector approach to resource management has depleted resources on the land and in the ocean.

The Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance is working to return us to the healthy communities and sustainable resource management practices of our past by ensuring First Nations interests and traditional knowledge are balanced with the best western science.

Keepers of the Coast

Watch this documentary 

Stewarding our marine territories

The central coast of British Columbia is one of the most spectacular and biologically rich places left on the planet – where ancient temperate rainforest intertwines with the living Pacific. The Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv who have inhabited the central coast for thousands of years have joined forces, forming the Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance, otherwise known as CCIRA.

More about CCIRA 

Recent posts

Issue # 11, March 2020
April 29, 2020
Inside this issue: Download the PDFS You can download a PDF of this issue and all the previous issues as well. More about Issue #10
Five things you should know about rockfish and marine protection
April 27, 2020
Since 2013, CCIRA has been using science and traditional knowledge to build the most extensive database for rockfish ever compiled for the Central Coast. This growing body of work is providing insights that can help improve the design of the Marine Protected Areas network...
MPA Network and Fisheries Reconciliation Agreement create hope for new opportunities
April 17, 2020
25 years from now things could look very different on the Central Coast. Ocean ecosystems could be healthier and fish populations more robust with a thriving food fishery for local people. These outcomes are some of the possible benefits from the implementation of the Government-to-Government-Government Northern Shelf Bioregion Marine Protected Area (MPA) Network process – ...
CCIRA joins international research expedition
April 15, 2020
2019 was a bad year for salmon returns coast-wide in British Columbia, and an international team of scientists has been trying to figure out why. This March, the research team travelled back to the open Pacific for a second expedition to study the ocean survival of salmon, and this year CCIRA’s Field Technician, Tristan Blaine, ...
Nuxalk Atnarko sockeye study an example of collaborative research done right
April 10, 2020
In response to the impacts on local people and ecosystems, a recovery plan was written in 2016 by the Nuxalk Nation in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)...
Alejandro Frid publishes new book
February 10, 2020
As CCIRA’s Science Coordinator, Alejandro Frid has established an impressive record of publishing research papers in esteemed journals. Much of this research is aimed at enhancing marine conservation by integrating science with Indigenous knowledge. But on his own time, he has also published two books!  His most recent book came out this fall.  Changing Tides: ...
New fishing closures proposed for crab
January 9, 2020
The two key findings from our published research papers are: (1) our catches have declined such that we cannot meet our FSC needs, and (2) fishing closures can help crab populations recover.
CCIRA hires new staff
January 2, 2020
Desiree Lawson, MaPP implementation coordinator Desiree is Haíɫzaqv and lives in her home territory in Bella Bella. She is passionate about supporting the Nations as they assert their inherent title and rights by practicing their ancestral laws. She understands the importance of indigenous stewardship; the need to respect all living beings and their right to ...
Living ancestors’ dreams in Bella Bella with new Big House
November 1, 2019
In October of 2019 the Heiltsuk Nation officially opened the first new Big House in their territory in 120 years. As we move into the next decade, CCIRA is excited for the new beginnings the Big House signifies. Speaking to reporters at the time of the opening, Heiltsuk’s William Housty said, “there’s a sense of ...